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Columbus Day Storm anniversary

Trees fell onto seven cabins and a house at R.W. Dimbat’s Cafe and cabins on Spirit Lake Highway near Toutle. No one was hurt, even though six of the cabins were occupied.

My husband, Lynn, was in the Air Force and stationed on the East Coast. I had major surgery, so our teenage children and I were staying with my folks in Portland. My father, Bill, a World War I vet, was in the Veterans Hospital on the hill. We went up to the hospital to bring him home and we hadn't heard all the alerts about the forthcoming storm.

On the way home we commented on the funny brown clouds that were in the sky. When we arrived home, the wind started blowing stronger. My daughter Marilynn was upstairs in her room. She came running down saying the neighbor’s shingles had just blown through her window and just missed her. Then, as we looked out the window, the neighbors fiberglass stationary window awning came flying toward our house. I ran out to catch it so that it wouldn't break the window. Our neighbor and I reached it at the same time. The tree across the street blew over. It was amazing at how slowly it went down.

The electricity went off. We had a gas furnace, but didn't have heat due to the fan being run by electricity.

The thing that impressed me the most was that the whole West Side of Portland, clear out to the Alpenrose Dairy, Vermont Hills, in Portland was without water due to the main west side water pump in the city getting damaged during the storm. This outage lasted for several days.

— Ruby M. Hazen, Silver Lake

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