Skip to main contentSkip to main content
Updating results

Performing Arts

  • Updated

Something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue – all these elements went into the costuming of “Downton Abbey: A New Era.” While that phrase is usually applied to good luck tokens worn by brides on their big day – the new period drama not only opens with a wedding, but displays around 300 garments over the duration of the movie. Anna Robbins is the costume designer in charge of dressing both the upstairs and the downstairs residents of Downton.Having worked on the TV series and 2019 film, she has plenty of experience to draw on.

  • Updated

Fabio Luisi will conduct a Ring Cycle in concert with the Dallas Symphony in from Oct. 13-20, 2024. Luisi, who became music director for the 2020-21 season, will conduct two performances each of “Das Rheingold” and “Die Walküre” in May 2024, then add “Siegfried” and “Götterdämmerung (The Twilight of the Gods)” that fall, when the first two operas come back for an additional performance. Mark Delavan will sing Wotan. Delavan will be joined by Lise Lindstrom as Brünnhilde, Daniel Johansson as Siegfried, Tómas Tomasson as Alberich, Sara Jakubiak as Sieglinde and Christopher Ventris playing Siegmund. The four Wagner operas are considered the most demanding repertoire for an opera company.

  • Updated

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead, all right, but not as Shakespeare imagined. No Norwegian prince arrives to seize the Danish throne. And to be or not to be is not the question. So it goes in the latest operatic adaptation of the most famous play in the English language. “Hamlet,” with music by Brett Dean and libretto by Matthew Jocelyn, opens at the Metropolitan Opera on Friday. Jocelyn has taken pains to condense the play into an opera that runs less than three hours. He says he opted to focus on a family story, along the way changing familiar bits and cutting out subplots. The opera is the final new production in the Met's comeback-from-COVID season.

  • Updated

Tulsa historical officials say enough pieces of a stolen bronze statue of a famous Native American ballerina have been recovered to restore it. Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Director Michelle Place told the Tulsa World that the additional missing pieces of the statue of Marjorie Tallchief include the head. One of the original sculptors says he will be able to restore the statue. Still missing are the lower half of each leg, both feet and one arm. Tallchief and her sister, Maria Tallchief, were among five Native American ballerinas known as renowned Five Moons and a bronze statue of each was placed outside the Tulsa museum.

  • Updated

American Ballet Theatre has named its first new artistic director in 30 years. Susan Jaffe, who was a celebrated ballerina at ABT for more than two decades, takes over from Kevin McKenzie in December. In addition to her 22 years as a principal dancer at ABT — one of the top classical ballet companies in the world — Jaffe danced as a guest with companies across the globe like the Royal Ballet, the Kirov, the Stuttgart Ballet, La Scala and many others. She says she aims to increase access and inclusivity in the overwhelmingly white world of classical ballet.

  • Updated

Joshua Cohen’s “The Netanyahus,” a comic and rigorous campus novel based on the true story of the father of former Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu seeking a job in academia, has won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Many of the winners in the arts Monday were explorations of race and class, in the past and the present.James Ijames’ “Fat Ham,” an adaptation of Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” set at a Black family’s barbecue in the modern South, received the Pulitzer for drama. The late artist Winfred Rembert won in biography for “Chasing Me to My Grave," as told to Erin I. Kelly.

  • Updated

A Reuters photographer who was killed while covering fighting in Afghanistan was part of a team that took home the Pulitzer for feature photography. Danish Siddiqui and his colleagues Adnan Abidi, Sanna Irshad Mattoo and Amit Dave won for images depicting the toll of the COVID-19 pandemic in India. Their work, which was moved from the breaking photography category by the judges, “balanced intimacy and devastation, while offering viewers a heightened sense of place,” the committee wrote. Siddiqui had been embedded with Afghan special forces in July and was killed as the commando unit battled for control of a crossing on the border between southern Afghanistan and Pakistan.

  • Updated

Top nominees entering this year's Tony Awards will be the musicals “A Strange Loop,” “MJ” and “Paradise Square,” each of which earned nominations in double figures Monday. Some acting nominations went to Billy Crystal, Myles Frost, Hugh Jackman, Rob McClure and Jaquel Spivey. The best actress in a musical category is filled by Sharon D Clarke from “Caroline, or Change,” Carmen Cusack in “Flying Over Sunset,” from Sutton Foster in “The Music Man,” Joaquina Kalukango in “Paradise Square” and Mare Winningham from “Girl From The North Country.” The best play candidates are “Clyde’s,” “Hangmen,” “The Lehman Trilogy,” “The Minutes,” and "Skeleton Crew”

  • Updated

An online auction of 150 of items owned by the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg raised $803,650 for Washington National Opera. The opera was one of the late justice’s passions. The auction ended in late April, and buyers are now picking up items or arranging to have them shipped to their homes in 38 states, the District of Columbia, Canada and Germany. The auction’s biggest ticket item was the drawing of Ginsburg, which sold for $55,000. The image had accompanied a 2015 article about her in The New York Times. Ginsburg liked it so much she got a copy for her Supreme Court office signed by the artist, Eleanor Davis.

  • Updated

“A Strange Loop,” Michael R. Jackson’s critically cheered theater meta-journey earned a leading 11 Tony Award nominations Monday as Broadway joined the national discussion of race by embracing an envelope-pushing Black-written and Black-led musical. Jackson’s 2020 Pulitzer Prize drama winner about a Black gay man writing a show about a Black gay man earned nods for best musical, best leading man in newcomer Jaquel Spivey and best featured actress for L Morgan Lee, who becomes the first openly transgender performer to be nominated for a Tony Award. Jackson says he had “hoped” his "collaborators would be acknowledged.'' Right behind “A Strange Loop” is a tie with 10 nominations each for “MJ” and “Paradise Square.”

  • Updated

After a two-year delay due to the coronavirus, Germany’s famous Oberammergau Passion Play is opening soon. The play dates back to 1634, when Catholic residents of a small Bavarian village vowed to perform a play of the last days of Jesus Christ every 10 years, if only God would spare them of any further Black Death victims. The town did suffer some COVID-19 deaths, but the show goes on. Almost half of the village’s residents — more than 1,800 people including 400 children — will participate. The new performance includes a Muslim actor for the first time, and the cast includes refugee children on stage. Its longstanding antisemitic plot lines have been eliminated.

  • Updated

Amid all the horrors that have unfolded in the war on Ukraine, the Russian airstrike on the theater being used as a bomb shelter in Mariupol on March 16 stands out as the single deadliest known attack against civilians to date. An Associated Press investigation has found evidence that the attack was far deadlier than estimated, killing closer to 600 people. That’s almost double the current estimates. The AP recreated what happened inside the theater on that day from the accounts of 23 survivors, rescuers, and people intimately familiar with the theater’s new life as a bomb shelter. The AP also built a 3D model based on witness accounts, two sets of floor plans of the theater, photos and video taken inside before, during and after that day, and expert comment.

  • Updated

Amid all the horrors that have unfolded in the war on Ukraine, the Russian airstrike on the theater being used as a bomb shelter in Mariupol on March 16 stands out as the single deadliest known attack against civilians to date. An Associated Press investigation has found evidence that the attack was far deadlier than estimated, killing closer to 600 people. That’s almost double the current estimates. The AP recreated what happened inside the theater on that day from the accounts of 23 survivors, rescuers, and people intimately familiar with the theater’s new life as a bomb shelter. The AP also built a 3D model based on witness accounts, two sets of floor plans of the theater, photos and video taken inside before, during and after that day, and expert comment.

  • Updated

Authorities in Oklahoma say a bronze statue of a famous Native American ballerina was cut from its base outside a Tulsa museum and sold for scrap to a recycling company. Museum officials say the Five Moons statue of Marjorie Tallchief was likely removed Thursday from its plinth outside the Tulsa Historical Society. The Tulsa World newspaper reports that  museum officials received a call Monday from CMC Recycling in southwest Rogers County. That company identified what they believed were pieces of the bronze statue. Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Director Michelle Place checked out the recovered pieces late Monday morning and verified that they came from the statue.

  • Updated

What is billed by organizers as the world’s largest powwow is being held in person in Albuquerque for the first time since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. The Gathering of Nations is returning following all-virtual powwows in 2020 and 2021. Friday's festivities included a grand entrance, with hundreds of dancers forming a procession that filled the arena at the state fairgrounds. The event wraps up late Saturday with the crowning of Miss Indian World. In 2019, the Gathering of Nations drew more than 80,000 people from across the U.S., Canada and Mexico. Organizers say it also led to an economic impact of $24 million.

  • Updated

Ballet dancers Adrian Blake Mitchell and Andrea Lassakova moved to Russia years ago to chase their dream of performing with the best in a country where people live and breathe ballet. But days after Russia invaded Ukraine, the couple uprooted their lives and left behind their prized jobs with Russia’s prestigious Mikhailovsky Ballet Company in St. Petersburg. They are in Southern California preparing for an upcoming performance. Mitchell is American, and Lassakova is from Slovakia. They're among dozens of foreign dancers who have left Russia since the war started in February. They say the war is bound to take Russian ballet back to the isolation of the Soviet era.  

  • Updated

Actor Willem Dafoe is set to receive an honorary doctorate from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee next month. University officials announced Friday that Dafoe will receive the doctorate of arts on May 22. He's slated to speak at the school's two graduation ceremonies that day. He'll receive the degree during the second ceremony of the day. Dafoe attended UW-Milwaukee in 1973 and 1974 before leaving to become part of Theatre X, an independent experimental theater company. He appeared on stage at UW-Milwaukee in “Phaedra” and “A Moon for the Misbegotten.” Dafoe has appeared in more than 100 films, including “Platoon" and the Spider-Man franchise. He's currently appearing in “The Northman.”

  • Updated

James Corden will be bowing out of his late-night CBS TV show next year. Corden announced his decision during the taping of Thursday’s “The Late Late Show,” which he began hosting in 2015. In a statement, the president and CEO of CBS lauded Corden for taking “huge creative and comedic swings,” including with “Carpool Karaoke.” In those videos, Corden and pop stars including Adele and Paul McCartney performed sing-alongs on the road. Corden’s contract with “The Late Late Show” was to expire this August, but the London-born actor and writer extended the agreement for another season. He will leave the show in spring 2023.

  • Updated

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov is warning that Ukraine risks provoking World War III, saying the threat of a nuclear conflict “should not be underestimated.” In an in-depth Russian TV interview Monday, Lavrov blamed Ukraine for stalled talks between the two countries and accused the United States and Britain of pressuring Kyiv not to reach agreement. Lavrov accused Ukrainian leaders of provoking Russia by asking NATO to become involved in the conflict. By providing weapons, Lavrov says NATO forces are “pouring oil on the fire.” Lavrov apparently made the remarks after U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin said the United States wants “to see Russia weakened to the point where it can’t do things like invade Ukraine.”

Dozens of notebooks, scripts, speeches, drafts of letters, artwork and even signed baseballs owned by the late playwright Neil Simon have been donated to the Library of Congress. The collection offers historians and researchers access to the creative process of American theater’s most successful and prolific playwright. The collection includes about 7,700 items documenting the evolution of his scripts and screenplays, including “Barefoot in the Park,” “The Sunshine Boys,” “Brighton Beach Memoirs” and “Lost in Yonkers.” The donation will be officially announced at a special event with actors Matthew Broderick and Sarah Jessica Parker and Elaine Joyce, Simon’s widow on Monday. 

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alert

Breaking News