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JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Alaska faces the prospect of a partial government shutdown next week amid an ongoing legislative dispute over how much to pay residents in the form of an annual dividend from the state’s nest-egg oil-wealth fund.

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LONDON (AP) — Britain said Thursday that it intends to relax pandemic travel restrictions by allowing people who are fully vaccinated to visit a wide range of countries without having to self-isolate on their return.

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RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The North Carolina legislature neared final approval on Thursday of its annual farm bill, which includes the creation of a streamlined method for hog farms to receive environment permits to convert liquid waste into consumer natural gas.

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NEW TOWN, N.D. (AP) — On oil well pads carved from the wheat fields around Lake Sakakawea, hundreds of pump jacks slowly bob to extract 100 million barrels of crude annually from a reservation shared by three Native American tribes.

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COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — The parties involved in a lawsuit over South Carolina’s new ban on almost all abortions disagree about how the case should be handled while the U.S. Supreme Court considers similar litigation from Mississippi.

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ANTALYA, Turkey (AP) — At the Ananas Hotel on Turkey’s Mediterranean coast, the rooms were cleaned, the pool filled and the sun loungers distanced, as staff prepared to welcome back Russian tourists after nearly 20 months of pandemic-induced closure.

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WASHINGTON (AP) — A House panel pushed ahead Wednesday with ambitious legislation that could curb the market power of tech giants Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple and force them to sever their dominant platforms from their other lines of business.

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RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A bipartisan effort to legalize marijuana for medical use in North Carolina got a legislative committee hearing on Wednesday. But it's unclear whether enough legislators are ready now to alter their views on pot to make it law.

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HELENA, Mont. (AP) — A coalition of environmental advocacy groups threatened Wednesday to sue the state of Montana if it implements new laws passed earlier this year permitting the snaring of wolves and expanding trapping seasons, which they say could pose a threat to the state’s grizzly bear and lynx populations.

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