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Letters to the Editor

The work ahead

Thank you, Longview voters, for showing your confidence in me by electing me as one of your Longview City Council members. I also give my heartfelt thanks to the many generous donors, countless volunteers, my campaign team, the League of Women Voters and Koelsh candidate forums, the Daily News, KLTV Local Matters, Bicoastal Media, and my two opponents (Megan Ritchie and George Brajcich) for the great adventure so far. I have learned to be more patient with myself, and not to run faster than I have strength. The campaign was rigorous, but enjoyable. The work ahead will be challenging, but worth it. I will continue to lead with integrity and I look forward to listening to all voices as promised. Stepping out of my comfort zone, becoming visible, and taking a risk for the benefit of our community were all daunting, but rewarding. What I have found on this journey so far is that Longview continues to be an incredible place! We are in good hands — from our fire and police departments, parks and recreation, city staff and elected officials, directors, business leaders and owners, all the way to our great citizens. We enjoy so many gems that are all around us: an attractive historical downtown district, Lower Columbia College, Columbia Theater, parks and recreation programs, gorgeous Lake Sacajawea, and, just outside the city, Willow Grove Park and boat launch. Best of all, Longview is “open for business” with strong economic growth opportunities. It is my pleasure and privilege to have this opportunity to serve our city on the council — so, let’s put on our rubber boots, get busy, and work together to make Longview the best it can be!

MaryAlice Wallis

Longview

Parenting problem

I believe there are many people who would like to speak out about the Longview School District being sued by a few local parents concerning the “box.”

I will attempt to clarify several issues about the appearance of that suit, in my opinion. It was about the money only. Those high-dollar amounts clearly said that.

In this day and age, lots of parents dump their kids on the school systems with the expectation that the schools will fix or adjust or improve their child’s problems instead of looking in the mirror at their own inabilities to parent or get help for kids who have discipline or behavior problems and think the schools should do it for them for free, or nearly free. Those kids are there to get an education, and teachers should not be expected to do or correct what the parents should do themselves.

Parenting is hard work and, unfortunately, lots of parents are not up to it or don’t want to do it. If they did not have a relationship or get the love from their children, it was not the school’s fault. So they thought they found a cash cow and were told they could get millions from the school system for something that didn’t happen and/or their own shortcomings because their kids are now damaged beyond repair.

The kids were apparently assessed and already had problems before going to school and when the school didn’t fix them, someone was going to pay — and pay lots. Lots of money would make them better and improve your relationship with them or make them love you. Wake up folks, raising your kids is your job, not the village’s.

Bill White

Kalama

Landfill profit

I read with dismay the Jan. 24 story regarding hiring a private company to run the county landfill.

The stated reason was that new regulations will add $5 million dollars to annual costs at the facility. What is unsaid by the county commissioners is how that $5 million-dollar cost would be reduced by hiring a for-profit company to manage the facility.

Capitalism is based upon winners and losers.

Any company that is hired to administer the landfill has an obligation to maximize its profits, i.e., charge more than it costs to provide the service. Those profits are, by definition, waste since they provide no value to the county or its residents.

The notion that private industry will provide service that benefits the public and not itself fly in the face of reality. This proposed infusion of neoliberalism must be resisted.

Mike Phillips

Kalama