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Video Breakdown: 3rd Congressional District debate at LCC

Video Breakdown: 3rd Congressional District debate at LCC

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3rd District Debate
U.S. House 3rd District candidates, left to right: Denny Heck, Democrat, and Jaime Herrera, Republican.

We've broken down our footage from Wednesday's debate between Denny Heck and Jaime Herrera and published 27 short video clips that are easy to find and share. We've eliminated footage of introductions, moderator's comments and panelists' questions so we could focus on just the candidates' uncensored comments.

Click on the highlighted links below to view video clips of the corresponding comments from the debate.

3rd Congressional District Candidates Forum

• Date: Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010

• Location: Wollenberg Auditorium, Rose Center, Lower Columbia College in Longview, Wash.

• Organized by the Kelso/Longview Chamber of Commerce and KLTV

• Candidates: Denny Heck, Democrat. Jaime Herrera, Republican.

• Moderator: Barry Verrill, executive director of KLTV

• Panel: Dr. James McLaughlin, president, Lower Columbia College; Sarah Cave, Regional Vice President of Innovation and Business Development at PeaceHealth-St. John Hospital; Frank McShane, Chairman of Kelso/Longview Chamber of Commerce and Chief Operating Officer of Cascade Networks.

Denny Heck's opening statement

Jaime Herrera's opening statement

Question #1, from Dr. James McLaughlin: A recent essay in The Economist described our political debate today as being more about assigning blame for the recession than about suggesting imaginitive ways to really give our economy a boost. What imaginative ways would you take to Congress?

Heck's response

Herrera's response

Heck's rebuttal

Question #2, from Sarah Cave: Rep. Herrera, you have, as you stated in your opening comments, you are calling for the repeal of the National Health Care Act, instead advocating for incremental changes, including creating small business pools, portability features and tort reform. Incremental change over the last several decades has not done the trick. How can the inefficiencies in our current system can be satisfactorally addressed without more comprehensive reform?

Herrera's response

Question #2 rephrased: Republicans are calling for the repeal of the National Health Care Act, instead advocating for incremental changes, including creating small business pools, portability features and tort reform. Is it realistic to believe that our current system can be satisfactorally addressed without more comprehensive reform?

Heck's response

Herrera's rebuttal

Question #3, from Frank McShane: What do you see are the main roadblocks to business and job growth here in Cowlitz County, and what do you think the federal government should do, or stop doing, to help remove or reduce those roadblocks, and why do you think those changes would work?

Heck's response

Herrera's response

Heck's rebuttal

Question #4, from McLaughlin: Almost all candidates everywhere say they support a better educational system. What particular measures do you support to get us there?

Heck's response

Herrera's response

Heck's rebuttal

Question #5, from Cave: Given the continuing difficulties that state and local health jurisdictions face in meeting the challenges of providing services for people with chronic mental illnesses, a significant issue in Cowlitz County, what, if any role do you see for the federal government in addressing these problems?

Herrera's response

Heck's response

Herrera's rebuttal

Question #6, from McShane: How would you go about restructuring our tax code to incent growth in business and growth in jobs?

Herrera's response

Heck's response

Herrera's rebuttal

Question #7, from McLaughlin: In the past year alone, this college, Clark College — with the help of the Southwest Washington Workforce Development Council — has used a variety of federal job training funds, including special stimulus or recovery dollars, to train an extra 1,000 local people and put them back to work. How can Congress help us increase that number?

Heck's response

Herrera's response

Heck's rebuttal

Question #8, from Cave: Many critics contend that a major expense of the U.S. health care system is providing care to undocumented workers. Should the federal government make a more focused effort to enforce the immigration laws of our country in part in the hopes of decreasing health care costs for U.S. citizens?

Herrera's response

Heck's response

Herrera's rebuttal

Closing statements from both Denny Heck and Jaime Herrera

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