Details for Port talk Online May

PORT TALK
PORT OF LONGVIEW NEWSLETTER

The Port of Longview’s location on the beautiful Columbia River comes with great responsibility.

ENVIRONMENTAL PROFESSIONALS KEEP THE PORT SHIP SHAPE

Sean works hard to keep the Port environmentally sound.
With Environmental Field Manager

SEAN KELLY
BACKGROUND: Sean Kelly began his journey with the Port of
Longview in 2010 as our Environmental Technician and was
promoted three years later to the position of Environmental
Field Manager. Sean’s demonstrated understanding of
environmental systems and permitting requirements make
him a valuable member of the team.

The Columbia River is the Port of Longview’s lifeblood and
the responsibility of managing our relationship with it rests
with our environmental team. These folks manage everything
from the air around the Port, to the water produced from cargo
operations, all while making sure the Port adheres to a host of
related, state-mandated permits.

Just like the air, water at the Port is also carefully monitored.
Rainwater making contact with our paved surfaces (stormwater)
is treated in eight different locations on site, while water run-off
from cargo operations (wastewater) is collected and sent to on-site
treatment facilities. Once debris is removed, the clarified water is
sent for further processing at the city’s water treatment facility.

When moving bulk cargoes, it’s important to capture particulates
and prevent them from leaving the Port through the air or water.
The Port does this by using powerful dust collection systems
made up of enclosed conveyors, transition points and filters.
As bulk cargoes move through the system, the air around them
moves through giant filters called baghouses. Baghouses work
like giant vacuum cleaners, trapping up to 99% of dust from
the cargo operation.

Many operations at the Port are regulated by the Washington
State Department of Ecology, which issues permits outlining
how cargo is handled at our facility. Our environmental team
expertly navigates through these complex permits, ensuring
cargo operations run successfully and without interruption.
With a top-notch team of environmental professionals leading
the way, the Port of Longview is committed to stewardship of
our shared environment and preserving our quality of place.

TOP ECO-FRIENDLY PRACTICES
OF THE PORT OF LONGVIEW

Q: What are some of the day-to-day things the Port does
to stay compliant with its environmental permits?
A: “Air, stormwater and wastewater are all constantly
monitored, using a variety of systems, to ensure minimal
impact to our environment. We also do a lot of vacuum
sweeping of our roads and routinely clean out stormwater
catch basins and pipes in areas of cargo operations.”

•

WETLAND PRESERVATION: With an eye on enhancing Willow
Grove’s wetlands, the Port recently planted dozens of
shade-producing willow trees to help suppress the growth
of damaging non-native plant species.

Q: How does the environmental department contribute to
the Port’s overall success?

•

A: “We implement and operate environmental systems
necessary for efficient cargo handling. For example, we are
currently improving dock areas that will allow us to contain
and treat more cargo-related water (wastewater) than ever
before. When the upgrades are complete, the docks will
become more versatile and able to handle a mix of cargoes
that weren’t possible before. This flexibility is important
to our customers and to the Port’s continued success.”

CARGO HANDLING: Environmental practices are implemented
at the beginning of all cargo operations and continue through
the clean-up once the operation is complete. This practice
keeps the Port compliant with permits and contributes to
a cleaner environment.

•

RESPONSE KITS + TRAINING: Port crews can be on site, upland
or in water, within minutes to contain spills, assess the
situation and notify the Environmental Services Department.

Newly-planted willows are in bloom at Willow Grove’s wetlands.

EARTH DAY, EVERY DAY: A FEW MORE WAYS THE PORT STAYS GREEN ALL YEAR

4/19

RECYCLING

DUST COLLECTION

NO IDLING

A variety of items are
recycled on a daily basis
at the Port: office paper,
plastics and aluminum all
find their way to multiple
recycling bins.

The Port recently
purchased two new
baghouses to assist in the
removal of dust and other
particulates from bulk
cargo operations.

The Port implemented a
no-idle policy in 2015 to
reduce emissions from its
vehicles, resulting in lower
maintenance costs and
cleaner air.

COMMISSION MEETINGS
Regular meetings are held on the 2nd and 4th Wednesday
of every month at 10:00 am and are open to the public.
Meeting times are subject to change.
For more information, visit portoflongview.com

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