Behind the scenes, the roof of the pavilion that will cover the historic Shay locomotive on the Longview Library lawn is taking shape.

The steel plates that will hold the heavy timber trusses together were sent out for a protective coating on Friday. Once they’re completed, Brian Magnuson, the project’s general contractor, will drill, bolt and stain the trusses at home before taking them to the library grounds to assemble.

Once the timber trusses and metal roof are atop the pavilion’s eight log columns — which should be in roughly 45 days — the blue tarpaulins that have hidden the shining black engine will be removed, Magnuson said.

After that, a wrought-iron fence will be put up and sidewalks poured. The whole project should be finished this summer, he said.

All work has been done with donated labor, which has kept the pavilion’s cost at about $70,000. Even Longview City Manager Bob Gregory came to pour concrete and help with the foundation work, Magnuson said.

Many materials and supplies have been donated, said Magnuson, who said he couldn’t think of anyone who’s told him “no.”

Community members have donated more than $25,000 in cash toward the project. The Weyerhaeuser Giving Fund recently gave Friends of Longview, the nonprofit charity handling the funding, a $5,000 check. In addition, the Longview City Council provided a $37,500 grant from the Kuntz Family Trust fund last fall.

Longview businessmen John Chilson and Jeff Wilson spent several years restoring the circa-1924 logging locomotive, which had been rusting on the library lawn for decades. On Oct. 16, they brought the Shay back to the library grounds, where the 48-ton engine sits on a rock bed and railroad tracks.

Amy M.E. Fischer covers Longview city government and local retail businesses for The Daily News. Reach her at 360-577-2532 or afischer@tdn.com.

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